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Category : Transportation

  • Asia Dialogue - The Many Hazards of Driving a Rickshaw in Nepal

    The Many Hazards of Driving a Rickshaw in Nepal

    Sarah Rooney and Nayan Pokhrel (Fixer)

    “When I saw other women driving tempos I thought to myself, surely I can do this too,” says Shanti, a 25-year-old Nepali tempo driver [tuk-tuks are more commonly referred to as “tempos” in Nepal]. “Truth is, it was pretty difficult to begin with. I had an accident on my first day and injured a pedestrian. Because I didn’t want my boss to know about it, I settled the damages myself. But I stuck with it, and actually became a pretty good driver…” READ MORE

  • Asia Dialogue - Why secondary cities are well-placed to achieve disaster and climate change resilience

    Why secondary cities are well-placed to achieve disaster and climate change resilience

    Rowan Fraser

    Here are two important statistics from the UN:

    • Firstly, that 60 per cent of the urban area of 2030 has yet to be built;
    • Secondly, that in Asia, the majority of urban growth over the upcoming decades will take place in small and medium sized cities

    READ MORE

  • Asia Dialogue - Why ASEAN needs an urban agenda

    Why ASEAN needs an urban agenda

    Rowan Fraser

    In 2015, ASEAN will launch the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC).  The AEC, according  to ASEAN has four main objectives, namely to create a:

    • single market and production base
    • highly competitive economic region
    • region of equitable economic development
    • region fully integrated into the global economy

    READ MORE

  • Asia Dialogue - Viewing resilience as a value proposition for urban competitiveness

    Viewing resilience as a value proposition for urban competitiveness

    Rowan Fraser

    There are many reasons to invest in a city. And by ‘invest’ I’m taking a wide view: this might be living, building, producing, working or, of course, actually investing capital.  If you go through the different indices which rank the world’s cities in terms of ‘investment attractiveness’ or ‘competitiveness’, factors such as accountability of local government, market size, access to maritime ports, infrastructure quality, average per capita income, air quality and access to green space come up often.  Resilience, on the other hand, does not.  But it should. READ MORE

  • Asia Dialogue - Natural hazards are dangerous.  But city-level corruption causes more disaster

    Natural hazards are dangerous. But city-level corruption causes more disaster

    Rowan Fraser

    Oddly for such a staunchly secular activity, the insurance industry includes within its standard glossaries the term ‘Act of God.’  This is legalese for events which are considered to be beyond human control, such as floods and earthquakes, cyclones and landslides – disasters, in short. READ MORE

  • Asia Dialogue - How changes in the shipping industry are affecting secondary port cities in ASEAN and what secondary cities can do about it

    How changes in the shipping industry are affecting secondary port cities in ASEAN and what secondary cities can do about it

    Rowan Fraser

    At average cruising speed, a container ship crosses the Pacific in 20 days.  A transpacific cargo ship, for example, sails from Los Angeles and calls into Taiwan 19 days later, and into Hong Kong two days after that.  Singapore is a major port in the region, as is Shanghai – the largest port in the world. READ MORE

  • Asia Dialogue - Interview with Malcolm McKinnon on globalization, urbanization and nation building in Asian cities

    Interview with Malcolm McKinnon on globalization, urbanization and nation building in Asian cities

    Rowan Fraser

    Every so often, perhaps more often than I’d like, I catch myself in the middle of a cliché.  And as I get older the clichés seem to become more frequent which says something either about the number of clichés rolling around these days, or my dwindling capacity for originality.  Either way, I recently spent an afternoon discussing globalization in a Starbucks on the outskirts of an Asian capital with an historian from New Zealand. READ MORE

  • Asia Dialogue - The Commute Of Millions

    The Commute Of Millions

    Sarah Rooney

    “One of my friends practically lives in her car,” says Sue, a 30-year-old Bangkokian who works as a political analyst for a western embassy in the Thai capital. “The car has become an extension of her home. She has a wardrobe in the back seat with a change of clothes, a selection of shoes, whatever she might need throughout the day or night… She leaves home in the morning plain-faced and puts on her makeup as she travels to work. When she hits a red light, she does one eye. At the next red light, she does the other. By the time she gets to work she’s presentable!” READ MORE

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